Sunshine Blogger Award (Writer’s Edition)

Hi, friends. I’m popping up between regular Friday posts to answer a few fun questions about blogging!

The Sunshine Blogger Award is peer recognition for bloggers who inspire readers by promoting positivity and bringing joy.

Matthew Winters (Honest Thoughts from a Pastor) nominated me for this award. I like his blog because he’s relatable and down-to-earth. Check out his site!

Questions:

  1. Why did you start blogging? I started in September 2017 for a college course. I stayed because I discovered my niche and an awesome community of people.
  2. What is your favorite blog post you’ve written and why? I put my heart into what I do, so it’s hard to determine a favorite post in particular. This is the post with the most views and likes–Self-Improvement From my Disabled, Christian Perspective (on the subject of New Year resolutions)
  3. How long do you edit or agonize over a post before you press “publish”? I edit my posts at least a couple times, but some rough drafts collect dust for months, while others get cleaned up and published a week after I write the rough draft. It usually depends on A) how excited I feel about the post and B) what I’ve published recently.
  4. Writers’ personalities are often different than their writing portrays. How would you describe your personality? Friendly, sweet, happy, kinda nerdy
  5. What is your favorite social media platform and why? If we exclude WordPress, I’d choose Instagram. I like making my little inspirational quote images on Sundays. Pinterest is also fun.
  6. If you are willing to share your social media links/handles, what are they? Facebook Instagram Twitter Pinterest
  7. What tools do you use to “beef up” your blog? I use Unsplash and Pixabay to find images I can use for free, then I edit those images with Canva. [I just bought Canva for Work, which gives me greater access to images and more editing options.] I also have the premium WordPress subscription.
  8. What is the most valuable thing you’ve learned from blogging? I’m going to copy Matthew’s answer–“Blogging is so much more about the audience than the writer. I love connecting with people through my writing. “
  9. What advice would you give to a prospective/new blogger? Read Blogging Tips & Tricks: Improve Your Blog Posts & Gain Followers or any of my other Blogging Tips & Tricks posts 😉
  10. Have you ever been nominated for and/or won other blogging awards? Yes, though I sometimes forget about nominations–oops!
  11. Are you satisfied with your blog’s progress? Yes. I’ve really honed in on my branding, my posts are improving, and my readership is growing. I’d like to continue that upward momentum! It’s both a lot of work and a lot of fun.

Nominees:

Questions:

  1. Why did you start blogging?
  2. What is your favorite blog post you’ve written and why?
  3. How long do you edit or agonize over a post before you press “publish”?
  4. Writers’ personalities are often different than their writing portrays. How would you describe your personality?
  5. What is your favorite social media platform and why ?
  6. If you are willing to share your social media links/handles, what are they?
  7. What tools do you use to “beef up” your blog?
  8. What is the most valuable thing you’ve learned from blogging?
  9. What advice would you give to a prospective/new blogger?
  10. Have you ever been nominated for and/or won other blogging awards?
  11. Are you satisfied with your blog’s progress?

Rules:

  • Thank the person who nominated you and provide a link back to him/her.
  • Answer the 11 questions provided by the blogger who nominated you.
  • Nominate 11 other bloggers and ask them 11 new questions.
  • Notify the nominees by commenting on one of their blog posts.
  • List the rules and display the Sunshine Blogger Award logo on your post.

Thanks for reading! See ya Friday! 🙂 Question for the comments: what is your favorite topic that I post about (blogging, Christianity, disability, etc.)?

3 for 3: Triumphs & Disappointments in Classic Films

Hi, friends. My boyfriend and I watch a lot of movies, and we’ve seen several classics recently. Some of the movies were better than I expected, while some of them left me wondering why they are remembered so fondly. Here’s a 3 for 3 comparison of good ones and bad ones (in my opinion). Apologies if the pics take forever to load, but they do look cool, haha.

Classics I Liked

The Breakfast Club (1985)

Heartwarming–features representatives from the quintessential teenage cliques (jocks, nerds, etc.) and shows how they find common ground.

The Producers (1967)

Laugh-out-loud funny as well as memorable due to a hilarious, original premise and two very different main characters who complement each other. [Sidenote: the remake is also good.]

The Terminator (1984)

An intriguing and action-packed thrill ride from beginning to end. Schwarzenegger is scary but awesome. Cannot wait to see the next one.

Classics I Didn’t Like

Saturday Night Fever (1977)

The music is great and the dancing is fun, but this film asserts a coarse, vulgar view of the quintessential teenage experience with a storyline that’s “okay” at best.

Deliverance (1972)

Boring at some points, confusing at other points–the run time is padded with aaa lllooootttt of documentary-esque nature scenery. After the most iconic scene happened, I kept waiting for the other shoe to drop, but it never did.

Twister (1996)

Impressive special effects for the tornadoes, especially at that time, but many elements of the storyline–the characters themselves, the character development throughout the film, the quasi love story between the main characters–are lacking or uninteresting.

Thanks for reading! I know y’all have some opinions on these. I want to hear your thoughts. Am I right or wrong? Agree or disagree?

One Good, One Bad: Comedies With Selfish Female Protagonists

Hi, friends. Ever had a character in a movie, show, or book who you loved to hate? In today’s post, I’m addressing films with similarly unlikable female lead characters. In my opinion, only one of these two protagonists redeems herself by the end.

One Good

Bridesmaids is hilarious. Annie, the lead character, has an unfulfilling love life, but her best friend Lillian just got engaged. The movie follows the comical antics of the bridal party as the wedding gets closer, but Annie’s bitter envy eats at her. Her selfishness comes to a head when she ruins one of the bride’s events with a full-blown temper tantrum, and that’s what you might call her “rock bottom” moment…however, she realizes soon afterwards that she causes most of her own misery, so she implements real changes in her life like getting back into old hobbies. By the end, she’s grown as a person and made up with Lillian.

Rotten Tomatoes Rating: 90%

One Bad

Trainwreck is less hilarious. Amy, the lead character, was raised to believe that monogamy is impractical. She is slutty, and that’s not an insult because she has no qualms about it. She’s also vulgar, telling people she barely knows that she once had a condom stuck in her *cough*. She finally meets a man who she dates and eventually falls for, but the first time they have a serious argument, Amy goes right back to sleeping with anyone. As did Annie in Bridesmaids, Amy mends her broken bridges by the end, but her character development is slight/unconvincing. In my opinion, the underwhelming storyline doesn’t justify the nice conclusion.

Rotten Tomatoes Rating: 86%

Thanks for reading! Agree or disagree? 

Health Benefits of Different Fruits

Hi, friends. Here on the Northern half of the globe, summer has arrived. I’ve been eating plenty of fruit lately and loving it!

Each fruit is followed by a bullet point list with its best benefits. Since they all contain antioxidants and Vitamin C, I specified the fruits with high amounts. With the other nutrients and minerals, I listed them if one serving of the fruit contains around 10% or more of the recommended daily value.

Before jumping into the post, I want to point out one thing–the healing qualities of antioxidants.

20180605_114200
Resveratrol supplements I take for FA

Free radicals are harmful molecules in the body that damage body cells; antioxidants protect the body from those harmful effects. I myself have a progressive disability called Friedreich’s Ataxia, and the antioxidant resveratrol has been shown in clinical drug trials to impede and even reverse some of FA’s degeneration to speech and coordination (if taken in really high doses). That particular antioxidant also combats Alzheimer’s Disease.

Antioxidants essentially resist the effects of aging; for example, they help prevent heart disease, the leading cause of death in the US! I’ll do other posts on health and talk about the different antioxidants.

Another fun fact: these are all over 75% composed of water. No wonder I love eating fruit after the gym; it satiates my hunger and thirst simultaneously!

Apples

  • Vitamin C
  • Potassium
  • Skin HIGH in fiber and antioxidants

Bananas

  • Vitamin B6
  • Vitamin C
  • Manganese
  • Fiber
  • Potassium
  • Antioxidants

Blueberries

  • HIGH in Vitamin C
  • Vitamin K1
  • Fiber
  • Manganese
  • HIGH in antioxidants

Blackberries

  • HIGH in Vitamin C
  • Vitamin K1
  • Fiber
  • Manganese
  • Antioxidants

Cantaloupe

  • Vitamin A
  • HIGH in Vitamin C
  • Antioxidants

Cherries

  • Vitamin C
  • Fiber
  • HIGH in antioxidants

Grapes (Red/Purple, Seedless)

  • Vitamin C
  • Vitamin K1
  • HIGH in antioxidants

Kiwis

  • SUPER HIGH in Vitamin C
  • Vitamin E
  • Vitamin K1
  • Fiber
  • Antioxidants

Mangos

  • Vitamin A
  • Vitamin B6
  • HIGH in Vitamin C
  • Folate
  • Fiber
  • Antioxidants

Oranges

  • HIGH in Vitamin C
  • Potassium
  • Fiber
  • Folate
  • Antioxidants

Peaches

  • Vitamin A
  • Vitamin C
  • Potassium
  • Skin HIGH in fiber and antioxidants

Pineapples

  • Vitamin B6
  • HIGH in Vitamin C
  • Manganese
  • Antioxidants

Strawberries

  • HIGH in Vitamin C
  • Manganese
  • Fiber
  • Folate
  • HIGH in antioxidants

Watermelons

  • Vitamin A
  • Vitamin C
  • Antioxidants

Mentioned Vitamin & Mineral Benefits:

  • Vitamin A–bone health, vision, immune system, skin
  • Vitamin B6–blood vessels, cognitive function, nerve function
  • Vitamin C–immune system, heart health, skin
  • Vitamin K1–prevents blood clotting, bone health, heart health
  • Fiber–normalizes bowel movements, bowel health, controls blood sugar
  • Folate–decreases risk of birth defects (important for DNA synthesis and cell growth)
  • Manganese–bone health, controls blood sugar, kick-starts metabolism
  • Potassium–counteracts sodium to regulate blood pressure, heart health

Thanks for reading! What’s your favorite fruit?

Sources: onetwothree. Then I ended up googling them all individually and comparing sources. Sifting through it all was tedious! I don’t understand how fruit has existed forever, yet every source says something slightly different.

One Good, One Bad: Movies Starring Bill Murray

Hi, friends. Ghostbusters is one of the most iconic films of the twentieth century, and Bill Murray was excellent along with his co-stars in the movie. Aside from Ghostbusters, Murray has had several successes in his career. This post details two of his other films; though they are both well-received by critics, I only enjoyed one of them. Continue reading “One Good, One Bad: Movies Starring Bill Murray”

One Good, One Bad: American Classic Novels Turned Films

Hi, friends. I’ve been pondering what series I could start that involves the copious amount of movies my boyfriend and me watch, so here goes…

The series “One Good, One Bad” will briefly review one good and one bad instance of a certain type of movie, such as books turned films, specific genres, starring the same lead actor, etc. We’ll see whether I’m hard enough on movies for this; some posts might be closer to “One Good, One Meh,” haha. Hope you like the new venture!

One Good

To Kill a Mockingbird is a fantastic novel, though that opinion seems universally accepted by now. Aside from some missing backstory with the kids and Boo Radley, the movie is faithful to the book. The filmmakers edited the story in a way that tightened its focus but didn’t change its overall impact. The film’s acting and aesthetic maintain the feeling of the novel–the characters and scenery match closely with how I imagined the novel as I read it. If you like the book, you’ll like the movie.

One Bad

The Great Gatsby is also a beloved classic; it’s not a particular favorite of mine, but it’s pretty good (I’m more of a Victorian girl, despite my patriotism). The movie is basically faithful to the novel, though it unnecessarily gives Nick a new frame for when/why he’s narrating the story. The scenery is gorgeous and reflects the “Roaring 20’s” justly, but a stunning aesthetic is this film’s greatest attribute. The filmmakers turned a short but memorable novel into a long, plodding movie that’s initially confusing if you haven’t read the book. The worst blunder is the soundtrack filled with rap music that took me out of the film’s setting completely.

Thanks for reading! Do you agree or disagree? Let me know if you have suggestions on film versions of novels.

Capitalization in Titles & Lists Update (Wikipedia Has Different Standards?)

Hi, friends. In December, I published a post on capitalization in titles and lists. Since then, a conversation with a coworker who plays a semi-significant role in Wikipedia caused me to question everything.

Typical Capitalization Standards

In Capitalization in Titles & Lists, I explained the general standards for titles and lists. For titles, capitalize every important word (almost everything besides articles and prepositional words like “of” and “the”). Examples: 5 Ways to Make Your Blog Easier to Read, Who Else Was Obsessed with Lisa Frank?, I Freaking Love O Brother, Where Art Thou?. For lists, capitalize the first word and lowercase the rest. If a proper noun falls in the list, capitalize it. Here is an example to-do list with a title in it:

  • Mow the lawn
  • Paint the garage door
  • Water the plants
  • Order take-out from Miss Molly’s Diner

Wikipedia Standards

wikipedia

In an attempt to “avoid unnecessary capitalization,” Wikipedia treats titles like lists. In other words, a title that I personally would write as “1950s American Automobile Culture” would instead read “1950s American automobile culture” on Wikipedia (cool article my coworker wrote). I learned that the way I recommend for titles (capitalize every significant word) is called “title case,” whereas the way I recommend for lists (capitalize first word only) is called “sentence case.” Click here for more.

Bottom Line

I like my way and I’m sticking to it! Kidding but also not. Title case used to be the norm, but I found in my research that sentence case is used for titles about as much as title case now. At the end of the day, these rules are arbitrary. As Wikipedia states in the article about their standards, consistency is key. Pick a way to capitalize your content (either first word only or all significant words) and exercise your standard consistently. Inconsistent capitalization damages your ethos (if you want to appear professional).

Thanks for reading!

Sunshine Blogger Award Nomination

Hi, friends. I’ve been nominated for this award by a great Christian, bookish blogger, Taking Flight. Any time I receive positive feedback on my blog, I become more driven to grow myself as a writer/editor/historian/Christian/etc. The community I’ve built and continue building–me reading your posts, you reading mine, sharing likes and discussions–feels awesome. I love that we are all learning from each other. Continue reading “Sunshine Blogger Award Nomination”